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Posts from the ‘Janine Noack’ Category

Responses to BBC Radio 4 Germany: Memories of a Nation “Divided Heaven” Part 2

by Tiia Sahrakorpi and Janine Noack

This morning the second episode of the BBC Radio 4 programme, Germany: Memories of a Nation aired. Janine Noack (JN) and Tiia Sahrakorpi (TS) provided...

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Responses to BBC Radio 4: “Germany: Memories of a Nation” Part 1

by Tiia Sahrakorpi and Janine Noack

This morning, the first episode of the BBC radio 4 programme Germany: Memories of a Nation aired. Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, presented...

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Narrating the First World War and experiencing the World Café

by Janine Noack

Interested and inspired by the article about the Weber World Café Charlotte Jahnz published last month on our blog, I decided that I wanted to experience the WorldCafé myself. I visited on the day that the topic “Narrating the First World War – Experiences and Reports from Transregional Perspectives” was happening in Berlin. It was a great opportunity to spend an evening with experts in the field and a great range of participants from various different backgrounds.

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Why historians should learn how to code (at least a bit)

by Janine Noack

Historians spend hours and hours in front of computer screens and paper sources from other centuries trying to create a cohesive narrative. Mostly we use Microsoft Word to write down our ideas and the internet to browse for information. But our computers can offer us way more than that. We may not always be aware of the great amount of software aiming to help us research more effectively. When contemporary historians analyse the world we live in now, an immense amount of available data needs to be contextualised. That’s where coding becomes essential – not only for programmers but also for historians. Here are some reasons why you should take your first steps in coding right now.

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Launching #cycleofsongs, March 31 2014

by Janine Noack

On Monday, March 31, historyworks.tv and Pilot Theatre invited #twitterstorians and various other local people from Cambridge who are involved in the Cycle of Songs project to its launch party. The Cycle of Songs is an attempt to bring together historians, poets, choirs, musicians, and other interested parties to create a festive, fun day when the Tour de France goes through Cambridge on July 7, 2014.

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Conference: ‘The Media in History and History in the Media’

by Janine Noack

On March 21/22 the conference “The Media in History and History in the Media” took place Cambridge, Sidney Sussex College. Around 20 participants from European Universities discussed their research in the area of Media History and possibilities for historians to interact with the in different panels. The conference report will be published soon! David Reynolds gave keynote speech. Follow the link for the program:

History and the Media Programme

We tweeted about the conference using #dohistory.

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Cycle of Songs – Local History in Cambridge

by Janine Noack

Some of our bloggers (Tiia Sahrakorpi, Emily Ward, Marta Musso, Janine Noack) are currently working together with Helen Weinstein and historyworks.tv on the project ‘Cycle of Songs’ (#cycleofsongs). When the Tour de France arrives in Cambridge on 7 July 2014 we will tell hidden stories of the city’s past along the route of the race. The stories will be performed by local people, choirs and musicians and be available online to listen to via podcasts.

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Professor Sir Richard J. Evans on History and the Public

by Janine Noack and Tiia Sahrakorpi

On January 28th, 2014 Sir Richard J. Evans gave a Q&A session to Cambridge University MPhil and Ph.D students on what it has been like to work and research as a prominent historian in the digital age and earlier. Students sent in various questions about his career and how history has changed since he was a student.

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